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dixie_belle
May 21st, 2007, 11:31 AM
Hi Ladies!

I am new here, and I'm in a bit of a quandary.

I am trying to eliminate all chemicals -- whether in cleaning products, personal hygiene, or food production -- replacing with natural/organic alternatives. Before I found this forum, I had heard of the no poo BS wash. I started it about 3 weeks ago.

Everything was fine for the first week. The second weeks, the hair closer to my scalp seemed clean, but the length, from about 4-5" down didn't. By the end of the second week, I caved and went back to shampoo and conditioner (no cone). Oh, I was rinsing with ACV this whole time. My hair didn't feel all clean, and the ends were very dry.

So I started looking at deep conditioning. I'd heard of using mayonnaise, olive oil, various other kinds of oil, egg concoctions. So I looked around here at several different threads. Then I gathere my ingredients, and my courage, and took the plunge. I combined EVOO, raw honey, 1 egg, a little sweet almond oil, a little castor oil, and a few drops of EO (lavender, rosemary, lemon). Put it on damp hair, wrappe in saran wrap, then a warm towel, and let it sit for a couple of hours.

Then I rinsed it out with water, BS, and ACV rinse, and went to bed. This morning, my hair was still half damp, and looked very oily. Except for the ends, which looked fried. So what did I do wrong?

It was so bad that I went back and washed again this morning with regular (no cone) shampoo and condiitoner. My hair still doesn't seem right. I guess I should say that (although I haven't measured in inches), my blonde hair is down to my waist.

Any thoughts or suggestions will be much appreciated. Thanks. I'm looking forward to learning even more from y'all.

Dixie Belle

Wind Dragon
May 21st, 2007, 11:47 AM
What dilution were your BS and ACV mixes?

dixie_belle
May 21st, 2007, 11:56 AM
BS I had a tablespoon in 32 oz of water, and 1 c ACV in 32 oz of water, when I rinsed out my homemade conditioner.

When I started BS 3 weeks ago (caved after 2, just now going back), I had only heard of using not more than 1 T to make a paste, which was basically applied to the scalp. I assumed that was why the hair several inches down started feeling not really clean, since the BS only really got there as I was rinsing it out. I rinse the BS out with water before the ACV rinse, which I also rinse out with water.

Thanks for any insight.

DB

spunkymonki87
May 21st, 2007, 11:59 AM
Based on what I've read (and experienced myself), most people have negative results when using baking soda and ACV together. Check out this (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=37331) thread.

Milena
May 21st, 2007, 12:38 PM
Well, baking soda is a chemical, too, and I don't think it's very good for your hair. I think there is a reason why they make professionally formulated haircare products (besides, obviously, making money, like anybody who sells something).

I guess that's not what you want to hear, but if you want to go natural, I would recommend natural haircare products rather than foodstuffs.

Pani_Mniszek
May 21st, 2007, 01:17 PM
Welcome to the boards, dixie belle!

One cup, or eight ounces, of vinegar in a solution of 32 ounces of water is, if my arithmetic does not fail me, a solution of one part vinegar to four parts water. This is about twice as strong as I have ordinarily seen recommended. The rule that "if a little is good, more must be better" definitely is not automatically applicable to acids. (Mind you, I use an ACV rinse myself.)

As to what you did "wrong," what I think you did to make your life more difficult for yourself for the short run (not necessarily "wrong") is that you tried a lot of new things all at once. So it's really hard to sort out which product, or combination of products, was the culprit. For the oiliness, I would *suspect* the EVOO, which is notoriously hard to wash out (how much did you use?); as to the fried ends, I'd wonder if the BS might not have been too harsh. From reading both your posts it wasn't clear to me whether you had ever applied it as a paste to your scalp or had only used a dilute BS/water solution. Another possibility is that your hair does not react well to protein, and the protein in the egg did not sit well with it.

It is extremely tempting to experiment with all the ideas you read here. Bear in mind that some "natural" recipes for hair care can, in fact, contain chemicals, albeit "natural" ones. Naturally occurring arsenic is, after all, still arsenic (no, I don't know of any current hair recipes calling for arsenic...).

Good luck.

Pani M.

rainkitty
May 21st, 2007, 01:22 PM
Dixie Belle,

I've also tried going natural in a variety of ways. I've been pretty successful overall, but you have to be prepared for some experiments (both good and bad) along the way.

Personally, I have gotten bad results when using oil and honey in combination previously - it made my hair very crunchy when applied straight. It's also very, very easy to use too much oil in a mix like that. I just tried a mix of yogurt, honey, and oil, and I put in way too much oil. One wash took care of it for me, but it might take a couple of times for you.

Take some simple experiments first - and maybe even use a commercial shampoo/conditioner (or commercial CO) as a baseline for your hair that you can always fall back on when an experiment goes wrong. Establish what kinds of oiling (what oils, how much, how applied) your hair likes. Then try some combination deep treatments, since they're harder to get right.

Good luck experimenting!

Cheers,
RainKitty

spunkymonki87
May 21st, 2007, 04:42 PM
Well, baking soda is a chemical, too, and I don't think it's very good for your hair. I think there is a reason why they make professionally formulated haircare products (besides, obviously, making money, like anybody who sells something).

I guess that's not what you want to hear, but if you want to go natural, I would recommend natural haircare products rather than foodstuffs.

It's only "foodstuffs" if you deem it so :) Oils and butters can be thrown into the same pot and deemed unusable due to their more common roles, but that does not mean that they're not benefical to hair and skin. Have you ever tried clarifying with baking soda yourself?
Most of the time, negative results happen due to lack of (correct) information. dixie_belle, your proportions of baking soda to water may also be off in addition to using it together with ACV. This (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=26643) LHC article has a lot of information about baking soda and how to use it, among other related things.

Wind Dragon
May 21st, 2007, 05:12 PM
dixie belle, I recommend you read the first post in this thread (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=56523) carefully (ETA, whoops! spunkymonki87 snuck in there whilst I was occupied.) (ETA again: never mind, different thread. I'm just going to go over there now, 'kay?) Note that this particular method (the one I'm using, incidentally,) calls for the baking soda to be fully dissolved in water. That solution is your wash. I use one tablespoon of BS in two cups of water. That is then rinsed out, then I condition the length, rinse that out and then follow with a very weak ACV solution (one tablespoon or less to a liter of water, much weaker than in the instructions,) as a final rinse.

Since you were rinsing out a paste rather than a solution, consider that some of it may have not rinsed completely out of your hair. Then consider what happens when you add vinegar to baking soda. :scared: Just a theory, mind you.

Egg is also cleansing (I've used a concoction of egg and oil and honey successfully as my only shampoo for a few weeks at a time,) and probably shouldn't be used in any kind of "treatment" except the protein kind. Further experiments when you already have a problem leaves you not really knowing which things might have been responsible for what.

Your ends likely either need clarifying, and/or very gentle treatment and conditioning for a while. You might try going back to your usual shampoo, (perhaps diluted, which I highly recommend) and conditioner for a while, concentrating on the ends until things seem more normal.

dixie_belle
May 21st, 2007, 05:33 PM
Thanks to everyone for the tips and suggestions. I do have a commercial shampoo and conditioner that I used this morning, and it got everything out. Overall, it seems no harm done, I guess. But it doesn't seem particularly well-conditioned, either. Mosly like it was before. Ends still a little drier than I'd like, though.

I used 1/4 c olive oil, basically followed a recipe from another thread here, with a few drops of EOs added in. I got some cocunut oil to try, only its solid. Is this the right stuff???

When I used BS previously, I did it as a paste applied only to the scalp. This time, I diluted it in water that got poured basically all over. When I used the ACV rinse with the BS a few weeks ago, I noticed the first day that my hair was SO much less tangled than usual. I was very impressed. The only problem was that during that second week, the middle part of my hair (not the ends, not near the scalp) didn't seem clean, seemed naturally oily or something. It was kinda weird, being in the middle that way, which is what made me think it just wasn't getting clean with the BS paste at the scalp only.

You're right, I did try a lot of new stuff all at once. I kinda tend to go gung-ho when I first start something, especially if I'm enthusiastic about it. I guess I don't really like the idea of "experimenting" with my hair, in case I really screw it up.

My first "experiment" with BS and ACV a few weeks ago was great the first week or so. If I hadn't developed the not-clean feeling in week 2, I'd probably have kept going.

I think it was Benjamin Franklin who described his efforts to develop the incandescent light bulb not as multiple failures, but as learning 2000 ways NOT to make a light bulb. I guess this latest experiment is definitely how NOT to treat my hair. It may be that if I had shampooed the concoction out with commercial shampoo, it would have gone better.

Thanks again for your tips, suggestions, and encouragement. Now I need to learn how to do updos. I love the way they look, but I've never been able to get them to stay up with my hair this length.

Thanks again,

DB

Basketcase
May 21st, 2007, 07:24 PM
coconut oil solidifies below room temp, so its the right stuff , if you run the jar under hot water, it will liquify :) good stuff

Pani_Mniszek
May 21st, 2007, 07:56 PM
1/4 C. of EVOO. Hm. For comparison purposes, when I use coconut oil on my hair I typically use less than 1/4 of a teaspoon.

Pani M.

serenitygal
May 22nd, 2007, 07:22 PM
1/4C of EVOO? Yeeps!
When I first tried going natural, I mixed up some honey, lots of EVOO, and some rosmemary, cooked 'em together, and poured them over my hair. Ghastly mess, that was. Took several days to wash out, and by the end of it (didn't have LHC as a resource then) my hair was so damaged from the repeated full-strength shampoos that it would've been better not to use the mix in the first place.
You might try getting an organic or natural (and perhaps unscented) shampoo, diluted somewhat. Two friends of mine with severe chemical sensitivities (nasty asthma attacks around many chemicals and all fragrances, among other things) use Stoneybrook Botanicals products (the unscented versions). They say that it works well and doesn't cause flare ups. I use their products, too, and can say that they work GREAT in SMTs, etc.
As far as leave-ins go, I'll use a dab (think 1/8-1/4 of a teaspoon) of shea butter. I melt it in my hands (similar to coconut oil), rub it into my elbows and knees, and then run my hands LIGHTLY over my braid, with a little extra on the tassle. Any more, and I've got a nasty case of the greasies.
HTH, and welcome to LHC! I know all this can be really overwhelming, but hang in there; you'll figure out the best routine for your hair eventually and after that it'll be a lot easier--though experiments are fun! :)
PS-Trivia buff that I am, I love the quote--but would have ascribed it to Thomas Edison. ;) :D

dixie_belle
May 23rd, 2007, 04:49 PM
Thanks for the tip on HOW to oil.

I used 1/4 cup because that was the amount listed in the recipe, but obviously it was WAY too much for me.

So, to update ...

I washed with a no-cone commercial shampoo, followed by no-cone commercial conditioner. That was Monday. It got the goop out, but my hair still didn't feel normal. I have since washed it once more with shampoo, conditioner, and a white vinegar rinse. The one thing I loved about the ACV rinse a few weeks ago is that my hair has never been so tangle-free as when I used it. But I used much less in my 32 oz container.

My hair now feels mostly normal again, so at least I didn't ruin it. The white vinegar rinse also made my hair very tangle-free/easily untangled. The only real difference from before the failed experiment is that my ends still seem drier than before. So I was thinking of trying the coconut oil on them.

So, I REALLY appreciate the tip on oiling. I've been reading about misting ... either with EO or a drop of honey in filtered or distilled water. I really want my hair to be more moisturized and shiny. Would misting help?

Thanks,

DB

sapphire-o
May 23rd, 2007, 05:40 PM
Did you try oiling your hair after wash as a leave in? Many of us do that. It would definitely make hair shinier. :) Use a drop or two at a time, rub between your palms then into your hair from ear down. There's an oiling tutorial in the article section you can check out. I see you have fine hair, be very careful not to use too much oil. Fine hair is easily weighed down and can look greasy with just a few drops.

Curlsgirl
May 23rd, 2007, 06:02 PM
Several of the things you used are VERY drying and make my hair icky and crunchy. One is baking soda and the other is honey. I know you are still experimenting and believe me I know how it is to want to try EVERYTHING at once but the best advice here is to try ONE NEW THING AT A TIME to see how it does on your hair. Everyone is different. Some LOVE oils and some cannot use oils at all. A lot of people here love honey and BS but I cannot use them at all. Good luck and I am looking forward to seeing pics!!! :flower:

dixie_belle
May 23rd, 2007, 06:20 PM
No, I did not try oiling, because, frankly, I was scared. My hair looked (well, and was) so oily the morning after (even after the BS and ACV the night before). I didn't know if it needed more oil, or really what it needed. I wanted to do some more research.

One thing I figured out (although I don't know why it didn't occur to me earlier) is that I need to pay attention to the hair type of the writer when I'm looking at recipes and tips and such. I admit that I found many recipes at other sites, before I discovered this one, and most of them don't give any indication of the hair type of the poster. So, I'm trying to look for others with fine hair, too.

I think I might have done enough research to feel comfortable trying a little coconut oil. I'll let everyone know how it goes.

I have to say, I really appreciate all of the support and encouragement. Thanks!

DB

immortalstar
May 23rd, 2007, 10:11 PM
I'm a fine, fine haired person. My routine is currently as follows:

- Nature's gate shampoo (chamomile). This is SLS free.
- Use of a low-cone conditioner (aka, where cones are fairly low on the list) on the *ends*.
- Bore bristle brushing.

I've found that I really need to wash every other day, because my hair is so fine. There is just no way around it.

In the morning, if my ends look a bit frazzled, I'll dip them into cold water and then I take some 'fruit of the earth' aloe vera gel and rub it into them. I leave that to dry.

HTH =).

dixie_belle
May 24th, 2007, 05:36 PM
immortalstar,

Thanks for sharing your routine. Like you, I usually have to wash every other day. Sometimes can go for 3 days, if I'm wearing it in a ponytail or something (not down), but not always, especially during the week. Have to look professional, doncha know?

I really had no idea where to find aloe vera juice, or if the aloe vera gel ppl talk about is the same stuff you get at Wally World for sunburns. This may be a dumb question, but I gather that aloe vera JUICE is different from aloe vera GEL?

I accidentally found aloe vera juice at Wally World, in the pharmacy section near the castor oil. But my choices were like a 96 oz jug, or berry flavor, with sugars and colors and stuff I really didn't think I should be putting on my hair. So where do you get yours? And how much do you use?

I do have a BBB, but I"m not sure it's very good, because the bristles seem to come out a lot.

Thanks,

DB

Eriell
May 24th, 2007, 07:15 PM
I get my AVG at Walmart. Don't use the sunburn stuff with color and 'caine in it. You'll find the Fruit of the Earth AVG on the bottom shelf of the lotion aisle. It's just a clear 99% gel.

P.S. My hair does not like aloe straight, but I add it to my final rinse. Like you, we have all had to play to find what works!

birdiefu
May 24th, 2007, 09:28 PM
I would suggest CO to get the excess oil out, it works better than shampoo for a lot of people and isn't as drying. Take some thin condish (like cheap VO5 or Suave) and coat your hair with it. Lounge around with it for about 30 minutes (this is for really oily hair), then jump in the shower and add some water. Gently massage the hair until it gets foamy. Add a little more water. Massage the foam again. I can't emphasis enough how adding water and massaging it around is key in removing oil. Rinse very thoroughly. This should remove the bulk if not all of the excess oil.

willowcandra
May 24th, 2007, 09:49 PM
evoo is really too heavy for me and dries my hair out and is genareally nasty for me and will take lots of washing.

also egg is a protein treatment. protein steals every ounce of moisture from my hair and leaves it brittle and snapping.
lots of people have problems with protein,, there is a list of protein free stuff on the product board.

if you hair is like mine that treatment would have made your hair dull, oily (coated) hard to comb out and brittle rough and snappy. evil! if that's the case stay well away from the coconut milk soak! and castile soap.

Isilme
May 25th, 2007, 12:10 AM
If I were you I would find some brand of natural, enviromental friendly schampoo and conditioner. Trust me, I have tried to make my own schampoo out of eggs, but always ended up with buildup after just a few washes. When you get a little bit more posts you can read about it in my journal (many many posts about egg washings) To sum up, at the start I was happy with it but somewhere it stopped working. If you want to try it anyway I recommend you to use a vinegar rinse afterwards. But there was one good thing about the eggs, they always took out any excess oil out of my hair:)
A simple recepie:
Take one or two eggs, try to pick out all the white things that could get stuck in your hair.
Beat them
Add some water until it's like a runny conditioner.
The rest it pretty much a matter of taste, but I put in some drops of tea tree oil, a tiny amount of citric acid and a tablespoon of honey (just bear in mind that honey can lighten hair with repeated use over a long time, but it's also an excellent humectant) Them strain the liquid and throw away everyting that cannot go through by itself (meaning, don't squeez through anyting)
saturate your hair with it, wait some minutes and rinse in COLD water, condition as usuall.:)

wendyg
May 25th, 2007, 12:48 AM
I think it was Benjamin Franklin who described his efforts to develop the incandescent light bulb not as multiple failures, but as learning 2000 ways NOT to make a light bulb.

</pedant?Benjamin Franklin said a lot of great stuff, and he did discover electricity, but the guy who did all the lightbulb sweat and tears was Thomas Edison, who also had a pretty good line in quotables.</pedant>.

wg

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 07:19 AM
Isilme,

Thanks for the directions on CO "washing". i have some Suave conditioner. I'm glad to hear it is a good kind to use!

With the long holiday weekend coming up, I thought this would be a good time to try something else, since we'll be at home working. I was thinking of trying the coconut oil, at least on the ends, since they still seem dry. Now I think I will try that, since I have such good directions for CO "wash" afterwards. :grin:

Happy Holiday!

DB

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 07:21 AM
willowcandra,

Thanks for the tip about castille soap. I've read/heard some good things about it, so I was considering it. But it sounds like maybe EVOO is not so good for my fine hair. I guess I'll try to find some Jojoba. Any suggestions for where to get it?

I have sweet almond oil, and avocado oil. Would either of those work?

Thanks again.

DB

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 07:35 AM
Eriell,

Thanks for the tip on where to find good aloe at WM. I figured the colored stuff for sunburn was not what I needed, but I wasn't sure what was, or where to get it. Boy, who knew I was so ignorant!

Thanks for your help.

DB

Curlsgirl
May 25th, 2007, 09:52 AM
Eriell,

Thanks for the tip on where to find good aloe at WM. I figured the colored stuff for sunburn was not what I needed, but I wasn't sure what was, or where to get it. Boy, who knew I was so ignorant!

Thanks for your help.

DB

If you have a CVS around you they also carry the clear aloe gel in their brand :flower:

heidi w.
May 25th, 2007, 01:25 PM
Hi Ladies!

I am new here, and I'm in a bit of a quandary.

I am trying to eliminate all chemicals -- whether in cleaning products, personal hygiene, or food production -- replacing with natural/organic alternatives. Before I found this forum, I had heard of the no poo BS wash. I started it about 3 weeks ago.

Everything was fine for the first week. The second weeks, the hair closer to my scalp seemed clean, but the length, from about 4-5" down didn't. By the end of the second week, I caved and went back to shampoo and conditioner (no cone). Oh, I was rinsing with ACV this whole time. My hair didn't feel all clean, and the ends were very dry.

So I started looking at deep conditioning. I'd heard of using mayonnaise, olive oil, various other kinds of oil, egg concoctions. So I looked around here at several different threads. Then I gathere my ingredients, and my courage, and took the plunge. I combined EVOO, raw honey, 1 egg, a little sweet almond oil, a little castor oil, and a few drops of EO (lavender, rosemary, lemon). Put it on damp hair, wrappe in saran wrap, then a warm towel, and let it sit for a couple of hours.

Then I rinsed it out with water, BS, and ACV rinse, and went to bed. This morning, my hair was still half damp, and looked very oily. Except for the ends, which looked fried. So what did I do wrong?

It was so bad that I went back and washed again this morning with regular (no cone) shampoo and condiitoner. My hair still doesn't seem right. I guess I should say that (although I haven't measured in inches), my blonde hair is down to my waist.

Any thoughts or suggestions will be much appreciated. Thanks. I'm looking forward to learning even more from y'all.

Dixie Belle

OK, I'm not totally clear on the BS/ACV hair wash method but it seems to be missing a key thing, at least as presented in this specific situation:

conditioning.

Here's the deal.

Baking Soda is something I reserve for "clarifying" the hair, meaning strips the hair bare naked of all moisture. Usually a process reserved for buildup. And when I do recommend a Baking Soda clarify shampoo, I ALWAYS and STRONGLY tell people (I do not suggest, advocate, recommend: in this instance I outright tell them), to be SURE to condition the hair as part of Baking Soda hair wash or any clarify hair wash system.

Clarifying, with baking soda, as stated, means to strip the hair bare naked of any and all moisture.

SO even though you applied all these oils PRIOR to your hair wash, your wash included Baking Soda, so effectively, it all got stripped off.

When one fails to condition directly after this hair wash, then yes, the hair ends up dry and a kind of delicacy that feels tactile-y different and will lead to the impression of hair being fried. In point of fact, this dryness is actually a normal outcome of a Baking Soda clarify hair wash, or any time the baking soda is involved, UNLESS one conditions. Meaning, the baking soda hair wash worked!

If my reading is incorrect, it seems you are not conditioning the hair. Newbies tend to not realize how important conditioning the hair is, somehow.

I advocate for conditioning the hair length (not necessarily also the scalp hair and scalp skin) every time one washes all the hair length (there are ways to wash hair such that only the hair closer to the scalp is washed and not the length).

It seems to me this is missing, unless, I don't 'get' Baking Soda hair wash.

Thus, this is not a disaster. What you need is to condition your hair. I recommend Biolage's Conditioning Balm as a fabulous conditioner.

By the way, ACV Rinse is a rinse for setting the pH of the scalp skin back to something a bit acidic (out of the alkalinity zone), remove product not rinsed out off the hair strands, closing the cuticle (binding the cuticle) so they lie closer and tighter together within the context of one's hair type, remove minerals found on the hair that got there from the water supply. However, once hair has dried, ACV Rinse removes nothing so it is not a clarify hair wash method.

So, effectively what you've been doing with a BS hair wash is stripping the hair of all moisture each and every time you wash, and the way you describe your procedure, you are not replacing it immediately. You are expecting moist, lustrous locks as a result of stripping.

All you need to do is do whatever method you want but condition as part of your hair wash process.

Then you'll get smoother, softer locks that don't appear or feel brittle in any way. YOu can still add a leave-in, or an oil, or shea butter....you don't need to overkill on the other end either.

I recommend trying one thing at a time so you discover what is and isn't working in a clear methodical manner.

heidi w.

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 02:18 PM
HI Heidi.

Thanks for the elaboration on the BS "wash". Before I decided to "go natural" and try to eliminate all the chemical-laden commercial shampoos and conditioners (which was all of a month or so ago, so not too long), I did condition every time I washed, and I washed every 2-3 days.

I don't usually jump in with both feet quite the way I did here. Although, I thought I had done my research. I guess my problem was the uncontrolled experiment, doing too much new stuff all at once. Before I found this site, I did lots of reading and found several recipes elsewhere. I guess I (or maybe the writers) didn't fully appreciate the importance of knowing the hair type of the person recommending a particular recipe or treatment.

So, lesson learned. No more uncontrolled experiments. I think I'm going to try coconut oil, maybe just on the very ends, and a CO "wash".

Thanks for the guidance.

DB

birdiefu
May 25th, 2007, 02:25 PM
Ah, I totally missed that you were looking to go natural. I might suggest looking into washing with herbs- indian herbs seem to be most popular. There are quite a few threads on mixes and how people go about doing it, and if you tweak your recipie to your hair's liking you can get clean yet moisturized hair without any commercial chemicals.

However, I would suggest getting your hair back to normal before starting on that if you want to try it. My hair personally loves herbal washing, it just takes too much time for me to do it every wash.

ladiosaRosa
May 25th, 2007, 02:52 PM
Hi and welcome to the boards! You've already gotten a lot of good information here. I cannot comment on 'totally no chemical' products but I would generally suggest you be careful of the frequency of BS washing, using it in combination with ACV and trying not to over-protein your hair, ie., the eggs.

Mama K
May 25th, 2007, 03:30 PM
I wanted to say welcome and I'm trying to go natural as well. Everyone has given great advice. Personally, I do a BS no-poo w/ a ACV rinse about once a week as a clarifier. In between I use a natural shampoo bar and (lightly) oil my ends a few times a week. I still use a regular conditioner, but I'm looking to find a more natural brand.
Just remember to take it slow and let your hair/scalp adjust to any changes you are making before you can assess what works/doesn't/
Good luck!

Shermie Girl
May 25th, 2007, 03:48 PM
Welcome to LHC. :flower:

I am a lazy old broad and didn't read this entire thread, so if I am repeating everyone, just ignore me, or tell me to shut up. :silly:

I think that baking soda is just too harsh to be used as an only form of cleansing. It is very drying and can quickly turn hair into a crunchy mess. Add ACV to the mix and youch! Have you considered shampoo bars? There are very nice ones out there made from lovely ingredients. Perhaps a shampoo bar and ACV would work nicely for your hair, meet your natural ingredients requirements and not dry out your tresses.

I noticed that you did egg and oil as a deep treatment. Protein always should be used along with moisture or you could end up with crunchy hair. So, if you do a protein treatment, either do a deep moisture treatment before or just after protein and you should have better luck.

1/4 cup of EVOO is a looot of oil. A teaspoon or two should have been plenty, with your egg. A drop or two are nice for post wash oilings to seal in moisture and help make your hair soft and shiny. A teaspoon or less will do very nicely for a deep, pre-wash oiling.

I hope this helps a little. :grin:

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 06:50 PM
birdiefu,

I'm going to look into herbs, but I think that's going to take a little more time. In the meantime, I think I'm going to try CO, using a natural/organic but commercially purchased conditioner ... or use a natural/organic shampoo bar. And experiment with oils. I'm starting with coconut, but after reading the emu oil thread, I think I'm going to invest in some of that, too.

My take-away from this little experience? Take it slower, and try one thing at a time.

Thanks!

DB

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 07:02 PM
Mama K,

I was using BS/ACV every time I washed (2-3 times/wk). This was about a month ago. First week, fine. Second week, my hair didn't seem clean ... or maybe just a little oily ... in the middle, and eventually a little dry on the ends. I stopped because of the slightly oily feeling. I went an extra day between washings on the weekend, and what I was doing didn't seem to help, so I went back to S&C. Fortunately, the ones I had were no cone, so not too bad.

After a week or two, I was ready to try again, and that's what led to this thread. I really liked the vinegar rinse, so I've started that again, and am planning to stick with it, at least for now. I'm glad to hear that you do the BS every week. Based on some of the other posts, I felt like what I'd been doing was akin to washing with battery acid, and I was lucky my hair didn't turn to straw and break off.

It really does seem like my hair has bounced back. I'm trying coconut oil for the first time this weekend, but, after reading the posts about emu oil, I'm thinking about getting some of that, too. I want to try Meg's oil (I forget what it's called) for stimulating growth, and it calls for emu oil, too.

Since you have blonde hair, like me, I'm wondering if you have ever used honey? I've read that it is drying, and I've read that it is a humectant. Those are mutually exclusive, so it can't be both. Or maybe it is ... drying for certain kinds of hair, not for others??? I read where one person put a drop of it in her mister. I also have seen a lot of other ingredients that are darkening, which is NOT what I want. Have you had any experience with honey?

Thanks,

DB

dixie_belle
May 25th, 2007, 07:07 PM
Shermie Girl,

Thanks for your input. The measurements for how much oil to use when (after wash v. pre-wash treatment) are very helpful. I'm going to try coconut oil this weekend, and I'm probably going to get some emu oil, after reading all of the posts about it, especially since it is one of the main ingredients in Meg's oil.

Thanks for the help.

DB

willowcandra
May 26th, 2007, 02:09 AM
dixie bell. i really only use jojoba oil. i get mine from holland and barrat in the uk.
monoi also works well for me. i have some almond oil but havent tried it and i have no avocado so sorry cant help you there.

but if your hair likes similar oils to me then i usually stick to jojoba or coconut oils (like monoi) if that helps. (but coconut gives me the crunchies if used too often lol)

also forgot to add dablur amla oil is worse than evoo on me. huge disaster.
good luck with your experimenting.

dixie_belle
May 26th, 2007, 06:21 AM
Well, I tried coconut oil for the first time last night. No word on the results just yet. Many MANY thanks to Shermie Girl on the quantity to use. It was my first time using coconut oil. I would have used WAY too much, otherwise.

I have the coconut oil from Wally World. It melted almost as soon as I touched it, just from body heat. Is that normal? I've read severl other posts about running the container under warm water. But all I had to do was touch it.

I'll let you know how it turned out I (when I figure that out myself). I'm trying to decide what to do next: WO? CO? any input anyone??

Thanks,

DB

Shermie Girl
May 26th, 2007, 10:47 AM
Coconut oil has a very low melt point. It should start melting the moment you touch it. :) I have found that I like unrefined coconut oil even better than refined for my hair. It just seems to work better in my own hair.

I also love jojoba oil. It is my oil of choice for post wash oiling. A couple of drops work wonderfully. And as long as I don't overdo, I can oil in between washings, too. Really helps keep my hair soft.

As far as experimenting goes, take it slow. Try something new and give it a fair chance to work. If it isn't what you like, then try something else. But don't overload you hair all at once, you will have a rough time finding out what is working and what isn't.

I kept notes of everything I wanted to try. Lists of products that sounded interesting, then I started in on my list, working slowly through it until I found the products and methods my hair likes best. Starting a hair journal really helped, it is a great place to keep track of what I do, what works, what doesn't.

CO sounds like a great thing to try. It works wonderfully well for many people. I CO now and then but my hair really likes to be shampooed. With sulphates. Often. What can I say? :wacko: