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Celtic Queen
April 29th, 2007, 11:20 AM
Heya

I have a question for my mom:
She has salon-dyed hair, honey-blond a bit lighter than my tone. Can she use a vinegar rinse on her hair?

The question is because I gave her a sample of CV shampoo bar, and it's usually a good idea to do an AVC after. I had forgotten about her hair dye! :rolleyes: And she has had very bad experiences with dyes turning awful in the past, so she is very leary. Can any of you ladies reassure us? I found references to hennae'ed hairs doing great with AVC, but we are talking brute, ugly, fuming chemicals there.

Capriquarius
April 29th, 2007, 11:48 AM
I have personally never had any problems using the vinegar rinse over chemically-dyed hair. The cuticle-smoothing action of the vinegar actually helped keep my color a little longer, IME. However, if she has blonde hair she may want to try white vinegar instead of ACV, just to avoid any potential darkening. I bet the shampoo bar and vinegar rinse will make her bleached hair very soft and shiny! Of course, that's just my experience. Maybe someone else will chime in here with some expert opinions. :-)

summr
April 29th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Heya

I have a question for my mom:
She has salon-dyed hair, honey-blond a bit lighter than my tone. Can she use a vinegar rinse on her hair?

The question is because I gave her a sample of CV shampoo bar, and it's usually a good idea to do an AVC after. I had forgotten about her hair dye! :rolleyes: And she has had very bad experiences with dyes turning awful in the past, so she is very leary. Can any of you ladies reassure us? I found references to hennae'ed hairs doing great with AVC, but we are talking brute, ugly, fuming chemicals there.


I would do a strand test before using all over, it might strip the color.

Army_Girl
April 29th, 2007, 12:17 PM
Summr, it is a very good idea to do a "strand test"! Vinegar is used to set color and help it last longer, but some people cannot tolerate vinegar rinses. Too harsh for some.

If she does a vinegar rinse, have her to dilute the vinegar alot. Gently run the vinegar rinse through her hair, let set for a few minutes and rinse with water, then apply conditioner. My hair was bleached (fried) and I used to do that. Made my hair so soft.

summr
April 29th, 2007, 07:58 PM
Summr, it is a very good idea to do a "strand test"! Vinegar is used to set color and help it last longer, but some people cannot tolerate vinegar rinses. Too harsh for some.

If she does a vinegar rinse, have her to dilute the vinegar alot. Gently run the vinegar rinse through her hair, let set for a few minutes and rinse with water, then apply conditioner. My hair was bleached (fried) and I used to do that. Made my hair so soft.



Hmm I have never used vinegar on my hair before or after coloring, and its never been used on me in the salon., unless your talking about henna? Vinegar has 5% acid in it, my thought would be possible drying.

Was your hair bleached and a toner used or just bleached, because thats different from a color.

Celtic Queen
April 30th, 2007, 05:18 AM
Thanks a lot for the advices! I'll forward to my mom ;)

Army_Girl
April 30th, 2007, 05:43 PM
Well I am not the vinegar guru, but from what I have read an ACV rinse is the proper PH for your scalp.

Vinegar is used to set color dye as in coloring eggs, dye in cloth and other textiles. It stops the color from bleeding in laundry. Vinegar doesn't strip color. It also nueralizes alkaline from shampoos. It stops dandruff. It makes hair shine.

My hair was colored and bleached. I have used vinegar for years. It actually helped me to retain my artificial hair color. Now I use it to help keep my hair soft and shiny.

I use about 2 Tblspn vinegar to 1 qt of water.

summr
April 30th, 2007, 07:00 PM
Well I am not the vinegar guru, but from what I have read an ACV rinse is the proper PH for your scalp.

Vinegar is used to set color dye as in coloring eggs, dye in cloth and other textiles. It stops the color from bleeding in laundry. Vinegar doesn't strip color. It also nueralizes alkaline from shampoos. It stops dandruff. It makes hair shine.

My hair was colored and bleached. I have used vinegar for years. It actually helped me to retain my artificial hair color. Now I use it to help keep my hair soft and shiny.

I use about 2 Tblspn vinegar to 1 qt of water.



I have never used vinegar for hair color and I have never had a problem. True about using vinegar for eggs, and as with dying clothing, the only set Ive used is salt- thats what Rit dye calls for, so I'm not sure what dye your referring to.

With hair color, the developer activates the color, and it doesn't bleed after processing, it stays. I wouldn't use anything thats acidic on my hair.


Your hair was colored and bleached? Which do you mean, at different times bleached and then colored, or at the same time? What color were you using?

Army_Girl
May 1st, 2007, 03:55 PM
Not to beat a dead horse, but I use ACV rinses for softness and shine. My point to the original poster about vinegar not affecting the color was the fact that vinegar is used to stop color from bleeding or fading. That's all. Nothing more. If you don't use vinegar rinses, that's ok. What ever works for you!

netta
May 5th, 2007, 01:39 PM
Hi Army Girl - Netta here. Re ACV rinses, yes, I agree that a lot of people have had great success using this over variously colored hair, including me! While it undoubtedly gives slip and shine etc (and I personally love the after smell - it blends with my perfume Opium beautifully!!) I'm not entirely sure that it doesn't dry the ends of my long, one time heavily processed hair... the rest of the length is usually excellent re responding to AVC. As you're a long time devotee of AVC - could I have your thoughts on this one? Yes, it was happening prior to my 'Honey' forays!. Thanks a lot.

Peace,
Netta

Unnamed
May 5th, 2007, 01:47 PM
Being blonder, you might want her to use white vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar, as some have reported getting red tones from the ACV.

I didn't have any 'troubles' (ie, the vinegar (white) reacting with the dye on my hair). If anything, it set the dye a bit better, as my hair stopped fading for a while and I only did a few rinses, so her colour might actually last longer. I don't do 'em, though (end up with horribly tangley and a bit dry hair!) and find citric acid works better in a rinse for me, although I haven't used that often, either.

Aeon F.
May 5th, 2007, 02:36 PM
Hi Army Girl - Netta here. Re ACV rinses, yes, I agree that a lot of people have had great success using this over variously colored hair, including me! While it undoubtedly gives slip and shine etc (and I personally love the after smell - it blends with my perfume Opium beautifully!!) I'm not entirely sure that it doesn't dry the ends of my long, one time heavily processed hair... the rest of the length is usually excellent re responding to AVC. As you're a long time devotee of AVC - could I have your thoughts on this one? Yes, it was happening prior to my 'Honey' forays!. Thanks a lot.

Peace,
Netta

Netta, my hair's been very over-processed in the past (lots & lots of dying- both salon and at home drugstore stuff..), plus a few perms (such a bad idea!) & body waves way back when too. and ACV doesn't dry out my hair or the ends at all. I actually find that it makes my ends look and feel better. Anyway, that's just my :twocents: from my experiences.. hths! :D

summr
May 5th, 2007, 04:12 PM
Netta, my hair's been very over-processed in the past (lots & lots of dying- both salon and at home drugstore stuff..), plus a few perms (such a bad idea!) & body waves way back when too. and ACV doesn't dry out my hair or the ends at all. I actually find that it makes my ends look and feel better. Anyway, that's just my :twocents: from my experiences.. hths! :D



Is your hair chemically processed now- A perm or color ?

Army_Girl
May 6th, 2007, 03:14 PM
Aeon and Netta,

I use a vinegar rinse to help maintain the scalp PH. Yes, it helps make my hair shiny and soft, but I too suffer from crunchy ends. It seems to only be the very last 1/2 inch.

After I use the rinse, I rinse my hair with cool water and then a conditioner on the ends only. After I air dry I use oil on the ends.

My hair from the ends working up have:
brown dye (Loreal)
straightener (lye)
more brown dye
highlights (salaon processed or bleached)
high lift Loreal color for Brunettes only
Henna

The roots have henna only. About mid length down is straightened. So my hair has been majorly abused.:twisted:

Can I get by without the ACV rinse? Sure. But I find it makes my hair soft and shiny, not drier. My ends are not breaking off, not split, just a little crunchy. I bun my hair and take care of it. When it gets to BSL I will trim about an inch off.

For anyone who wants to research vinegar rinses, there are articles here on the Long Hair Community. Vinegar *is* acidic, but it helps to bring your scalp back to the proper PH for optimum hair growth. That is the main (mane) reason I use it.:hollie: I want very long beautiful hair. I have grown very long hair before and I miss it.

Army_Girl
May 6th, 2007, 03:23 PM
This was posted by Heidi on ACV rinses. VERY informative:
On Clarifying & Chelating: An ACV Rinse is not a clarifying shampoo.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I repetitively notice on the long hair care boards the common misunderstanding that an ACV rinse is a clarifying hair wash. My aim in this post is to rectify the misunderstanding and explain the purpose of an ACV Rinse. No offense is meant to anyone in particular if they misunderstand. It is easy to come to these confusions on the boards. It's hard to get through all the info out there and understand everything. (Right now I'm pondering what "scritching" is....see! It's easy not to understand).

Alright, I am copying the post I just gave in another thread here, and creating a new post with it. Lower I discuss clarifying and chelating and provide a thread to my more thorough coverage of this topic.

___________________
Please know that an ACV rinse is not a method of "clarifying."

ACV Rinse (for those who don't know what this stands for is Apple Cider Vinegar). Any vinegar will work for such a rinse (although I wouldn't use a balsamic vinegar or flavored vinegar...balsamic has a lot of sugar in it), but ACV is the best choice since it often has "the mother" in it as the Bragg's brand calls it....simply meaning the pulp of apple is in it.

ACV Rinse is the final application after both shampoo and conditioner are completed. Here's why.

1) pH balances the scalp of the skin. Some shampoos upset the pH of the scalp skin which should be neutral, approximately 7.0, between the polarities of alkaline and acidic. Some people condition the scalp hair, and the ACV rinse will help then too meaning if one does this practice, ACV Rinse after conditioning is completed.

This is the largest benefit and primary reason for an ACV rinse.

2) Vinegar acts to "bind" the cuticle, the outer layer of hair, the protective barrier of hair. This means that it helps the cuticle to lie more in its natural position of closer and tighter together of overlapping scales. In this way, shine and smoothness of the hair's texture is mildly improved.

This is the second benefit of an ACV rinse.

3) ACV Rinse can only "clarify" in that exact and specific hair wash session, to remove any small residual product left on the hair that perhaps the rinsing may have missed. It does not have the ability to remove product, grime and oils and/or sebum that has built up over time on the hair strands. When doing a "clarifying shampoo" the ACV Rinse can be the final step, also.

This is the third benefit of an ACV rinse in the hierarchy of the ability of an ACV rinse to do its work. This benefit is minor and not strong at all. The largest reason to ACV rinse is to pH balance.

When there's buildup one needs something relatively strong to break down the dirt, sebum, oil and product. ACV, nor any vinegar, is strong enough to break through the bond.

I hope this helps people understand the appropriate reasons for using an ACV rinse.

For those who don't know yet about ACV Rinses, 1 tablespoon of ACV diluted well in 8 oz of water is a standard dilution ratio. One can increase the amount of ACV, perhaps 2-3 tablespoons, but never come close to approaching, for example, 50/50, nor do 100% vinegar, ever.

Celtic Queen
May 6th, 2007, 04:23 PM
Very informative! Thanks a load!

netta
May 8th, 2007, 08:34 AM
Thanks Lori - your personal comments were particularly helpful to me... yes, its only the last 1/2 inch or so with me too (re crunchies). Perhaps I need a trim - its probably been about 6 weeks, and like you, those naughty ends have suffered greatly re synthetic dyes, bleach, life etc.

Cheers,
Peace,
Netta

Aeon F.
May 8th, 2007, 09:04 AM
Summr, my hair is dyed now. (salon chemicals). I'd like to get away from that though and switch to something more natural-herbs, tea rinses whatever. Henna scares me because I know I will royally screw it up LOL. I also don't want red at all either.

The perm was years ago- will never repeat that disaster!!