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View Full Version : Least damaging way to get highlights...


Tiki13
April 2nd, 2005, 08:23 AM
OK, my hair downfall is that I just cannot leave it alone. I'm getting Spring fever and wanting my hair to look more summer-y. What is the least damaging way to get highlights? I like the cap method, but wanted everyone's opinions on which way they prefer. Thanks!

ChloeDharma
April 2nd, 2005, 08:46 AM
What about using lemon juice? That tends to lighten as does chamomile. There are other herbs too, such as rhubarb and calendula (marigold). To be honest you can't really chemically lighten your hair without some degree of damage/stress. Peroxide lifts the cuticle allowing the chemicals to enter into the hair, then pigment is removed. Some peoples hair can take this and not look damaged, but others (like myself) really can't get away with it. My advice would be to really think hard about this before going ahead with it.
Whatever you decide, good luck and i hope it turns out nice :smile:

Quirky
April 2nd, 2005, 08:53 AM
Igor will tell you about lemon juice. I wouldn't use it, which is saying a lot because I'm crazy!:silly:

Furiana
April 2nd, 2005, 09:23 AM
Lemon juice isn't the best as far as no damage goes, but it beats peroxide hands-down! I'd say chamomile is the way to go if you don't mind waiting a few weeks for results. (That's the price to pay.)

Tiki13
April 2nd, 2005, 09:53 AM
Lemon juice isn't the best as far as no damage goes, but it beats peroxide hands-down! I'd say chamomile is the way to go if you don't mind waiting a few weeks for results. (That's the price to pay.)

I found a recipe online that says to make a strong cup of chamomile tea, pour it into a spray bottle, spritz onto the hair and go outside in the sun. Does this sound like pretty much the standard procedure for chamomile highlighting? I'm assuming it would need to be repeated for several days. It's supposed to be in the 70's here tomorrow, so I just may load up on sunscreen and go down to the pool.

Igor
April 2nd, 2005, 10:16 AM
Igor will tell you about lemon juice. I wouldn't use it, which is saying a lot because I'm crazy!:silly:
I’m here, Quirky :wink:

I can testify that lemon juice is evil and damaging! Just think about it... lemon juice is harsh enough to tenderise meat if you use it in a marinade! Lemon juice will break the protein bonds in meat and in hair strands as well (and hair consist of 80-90% protein)

My own personal experience with lemon juice can pretty much be described with “disaster”
A friend advised me to bleach my hair using undiluted lemon juice and leaving it in for an hour, because it would be less damaging. Yes, because natural always means better and safer, right? :ponder:
My hair got extremely dry and fragile and I would pull entire squirrels out of my head. It tangled, tangled and then tangled some more. I tried deep treatments and lots of conditioner but it just didn’t help
In the end, I ended up removing all the damaged hair, which meant all my hair :rolleyes:

I know you usually wouldn’t use lemon undiluted or for so long time, but if the method I used can cause such a disastrous result, then even limited use will still cause damage
My advice would be to get it done at a hair dresser or buying an expensive home kit. I think its better to have that kind of stuff done by chemists done in a lab than something you mix yourself

Ursula
April 2nd, 2005, 10:27 AM
As far as I know, there is no non-damaging way to lighten your hair. Since your goal length is quite long, you may be better off forgoing the highlights. Even slight damage now may affect your ultimate ability to reach your long term goal.

As the spring and summer progress, you may see some subtle highlights develop, naturally. Artificial highlights are just a way to imitate these natural highlights, trading speed of results for overall hair-health.

If you want to celebrate spring with your hair, perhaps a new hat or head scarf, to protect your hair from sun and wind damage, would be a good alternative?

Rain
April 2nd, 2005, 10:36 AM
I'm with Igor! I washed my hair with conditioner mixed with baking soda and/or lemon juice (sometimes together!!) for a few months about two years ago because it was supposed to be a gentle alternative to shampoo. :shake: My hair was fried. It took me a while to notice because I was using gel. I didn't use a lot of gel but I thought maybe I was using too much and that's why it felt so crispy. Then one day I didn't use gel and my hair still felt like straw. It was brittle enough to snap in half when I bent it. It took months of rich conditioner for it to feel normal again. I don't see a difference in color between the non-lemon'd hair and the lemon'd hair but the difference in strength is noticeable.

Emily
April 2nd, 2005, 02:53 PM
Chamomile all the way! Be patient with it, its definitely the most gentle in my book.

LadyOttoline
April 2nd, 2005, 04:59 PM
Chamomile all the way! Be patient with it, its definitely the most gentle in my book.

Could you tell me how you use it? Do you use chamomile tea or in which form? SOunds like something I'd like to try!!!

I have been using different spray-in products like Clairol A TOuch of SUn, that supposedtly are "gentle" to the hair. ANother similar product that I bought in Germany (Guhl Blonde Spray by Schwarzkopf) actually claims it reduces spliss due to its "spliss-repair-Komplex" - but yet they both do contain peroxide. So what do you guys think, can they actually be "good" for the hair or at least not that bad...? Or would you still recommend avoiding any sort of highlighting chemical?
I haven't used them that much, actually only two or three times so far, and I've always used them in conjunction with deep conditioning or oil treatments when goind out in the sun, and I only use them on the upper part of my hair, not on the lenghts. I didn't have the impression that they made my hair dry or anything, but I am worried a bit about the long-term effects since I do want to get my hair much longer!!!
Thanks for any advice!!!

Daneille
April 2nd, 2005, 05:16 PM
There is no least damaging way. Even sun and beach do as much structural damage to your hair. Bleach can be the worst because it takes the damage (lightening) to a farther level. The method is chosen for the result desired. Long hair usually means foils or paper and not a cap.
Daneille

Polyhex
April 2nd, 2005, 06:01 PM
I agree that highlighted hair is damaged hair. Anything that lifts your color and makes it lighter is damaging your hair -- whether it's the sun, lemon, permanent hair color, or bleach. The advantage of highlights is that you are damaging a small portion of your hair instead of all of your hair. But it's still a tradeoff of color vs. damage.

I like highlights because they make my overall hair color lighter without the hassle of dealing with roots or applying chemicals to all my hair. When I got my highlights done, the stylist used foils (to protect the surrounding hair from the chemicals), and bleach without a toner. I prefer bleach instead of permanent hair color because the color does not fade or change over time. That means I will never have color reapplied to my length -- each portion of hair is bleached once.

SunCat
April 2nd, 2005, 06:11 PM
I would suggest chamomile. You could start with 1 or 2 teabags per cup of water and let it brew till it cools then use it to rinse your hair. It will lighten your hair over time. I wouldn't go out in the sun with it in your hair as the sun can damage hair.

Crysania
April 3rd, 2005, 09:05 AM
I have been using different spray-in products like Clairol A TOuch of SUn, that supposedtly are "gentle" to the hair.

Be careful, this stuff is the same as sun-in. And believe me, its worse than a bleach. ( if you use it often enough to highlight your hair significantly)
I have used camomille tea rinses for a long time, and lemon rinses and didnt notice any lightening of my hair. My advice, : go to a professional if you want highlights, someone who has lots of experience with bleaching hair.

Emily
April 3rd, 2005, 10:25 AM
Could you tell me how you use it? Do you use chamomile tea or in which form? SOunds like something I'd like to try!!!

I have been using different spray-in products like Clairol A TOuch of SUn, that supposedtly are "gentle" to the hair. ANother similar product that I bought in Germany (Guhl Blonde Spray by Schwarzkopf) actually claims it reduces spliss due to its "spliss-repair-Komplex" - but yet they both do contain peroxide. So what do you guys think, can they actually be "good" for the hair or at least not that bad...? Or would you still recommend avoiding any sort of highlighting chemical?
I haven't used them that much, actually only two or three times so far, and I've always used them in conjunction with deep conditioning or oil treatments when goind out in the sun, and I only use them on the upper part of my hair, not on the lenghts. I didn't have the impression that they made my hair dry or anything, but I am worried a bit about the long-term effects since I do want to get my hair much longer!!!
Thanks for any advice!!!

SunCat has given a good way to start
"You could start with 1 or 2 teabags per cup of water and let it brew till it cools then use it to rinse your hair. It will lighten your hair over time."

I've used it as a simple rinse for my hair after shampooing and conditioning; it leaves hair smelling nice and sweet. Doing this regularly ( i.e.: when you wash your hair) you will start to notice that your hair is lightening. As for sitting under the sun, its un necessary, the amount of light u catch normally is more than enough and if you are a sun worshiper by nature(or will be spending the day in the sun), I would recommend a good sunscreen hair spray.

Also if you decide to buy chamomile shampoos and conditioners (make sure your not just paying for the chamomile "scent") stay away from chamomile hair soap! I've tried it and it leaves hair feeling very gunky and sticky.

Eowyn
April 3rd, 2005, 01:06 PM
I have gotten highlights with chamomile. I buy it in bulk at the health food store, and make a super strong tea with it. Then I put it on my hair, put a plastic cap over it, and let it set for half an hour, before rinsing it out. It works well for me, although it can take a few times before noticing highlights. My hair is dark blonde, though, and I'm not sure if it would work for darker hair...

LadyOttoline
April 3rd, 2005, 02:26 PM
[QUOTE=Emily]SunCat has given a good way to start
"You could start with 1 or 2 teabags per cup of water and let it brew till it cools then use it to rinse your hair. It will lighten your hair over time."

Emily and Crysania, thanks so much for your advice - and I'll be dumping that Clairol spray stuff right away!!! Didn't know it was worse than bleach. Good thing I haven't used that much of it yet. And I'll try those chamomile recipes!.
Has anyone tried those John Frieda Blonde products? THey have shampoos and conditioners that supposedly highlight (or just accentuate highlights?)...but I don't want to spend the money if they are no good! Any experience with those?
Thanks so much again for saving my hair this summer!

)0(shortamazon
April 4th, 2005, 12:12 AM
Way back when..when I was a teenager.I had a "hippie friend" who used chamomile oil. She would make streaks in her hair with
that...also this may be odd...hair cream bleach (lightens arm hair and face hair) though thats a bit harsh. It took a week to notice
streaks of blond. (lighter shade)It depends on ur hair color though. She left it in till it was time for her to wash her hair, and repeated the process for a week. Hope this was of some help.
:)

chamogirl
April 4th, 2005, 01:14 PM
I use chamomile oil and lemon oil in my shampoos to boost my dark to medium blonde color. I also mix the oils in with jojoba and braid for a deep conditioning treatment overnight